Categories
1990s Featured Legacies Featured Legacies Home Home

Professor Emeritus Don E. Schultz

Don E. Schultz, professor emeritus of Integrated Marketing Communications at Northwestern University Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications, died June 4. He was 86. Schultz, a longtime faculty member, was a pioneer in the field of integrated marketing communications and had worldwide influence on how businesses approach marketing.

Schultz joined the Medill faculty in 1977. At Medill, Schultz chaired the Department of Advertising in the mid-1980s. He was one of the faculty members who led the consolidation of the school’s advertising, direct marketing and public relations curricula in the late 1980s. In 1991, Medill launched the first graduate-level integrated marketing communications program in the United States. He is commonly referred to as the “father of IMC” around the world.

“Don Schultz was a pioneer of integrated marketing communications, and he helped guide our venerable Medill School toward one of the most important new areas of scholarship and education for our era,” said Northwestern University President Morton Schapiro. “We will forever be grateful for his contributions to Medill and to our University.”

“Don was an academic leader and a prodigious researcher,” said Medill Dean Charles Whitaker. “IMC was his vision and he worked diligently to spread it globally. Scholars and marketers around the world are indebted to Don for how he shaped the industry.”

A prolific scholar, Schultz consulted, lectured and held seminars on integrated marketing communications, marketing, branding, advertising, sales promotion and communication management in Europe, South America, Asia/Pacific, the Middle East, Australia and North America. He is the author/co-author of 28 books, including the seminal “Integrated Marketing Communication: Putting It Together and Making It Work,” as well as “IMC: The Next Generation,” “Brand Babble,” and “Understanding China’s Digital Generation,” among others.

He is one of the most cited marketing communications thought-leaders, with more than 150 academic, professional and trade articles. He was the founding editor of the Journal of Direct Marketing (now the Journal of Interactive Marketing) and a featured columnist in Marketing News and Marketing Insights. He was on the editorial review board of a number of trade and scholarly publications.

“Don constantly challenged the status quo, including his own work,” said Medill Associate Dean for IMC Vijay Viswanathan. “Very few academics and researchers have the humility to do that. Don had an incredible charisma and an ability to connect with people of different cultures. While IMC had core ideas, he always encouraged marketers to adapt IMC for audiences and brands all over the world. He was deeply committed to innovation in both marketing and teaching.”

Schultz’s reach went well beyond the United States. He served as a visiting professor at schools ranging from the University of Beijing and Tsinghua University in China, to Queensland University of Technology in Australia, the Hanken School of Economics in Helsinki, Finland, Cranfield School of Management in the UK, and to the University of Chile in Santiago.

Schultz was an active participant in industry service, including serving as chair of the Sales Promotion and Marketing Association of America and past chairman of the Accrediting Committee for the Accrediting Council in Journalism and Mass Communications. He was also a member of the American Marketing Association, American Academy of Advertising, Advertising Research Foundation, Association for Consumer Research, Business Marketing Association, Direct Marketing Association and the International Advertising Association.

“Real thought leadership takes a very rare combination of things all of which are true about Don Schultz — bravery, courage and willingness to say the sometimes unwelcomed thing. Learned, wise and skeptical. Smart, clever and, ideally, continuously improving,” said Tom Collinger, associate professor and executive director of the Medill IMC Spiegel Research Center. “Because Don Schultz was all of these things, the marketing and communications industry benefitted. And Medill benefitted. And the University benefitted. And there’s the audience that benefitted most: the 30-plus years of alumni all over the world practicing in their profession because of Don’s thought leadership. To say he will be missed would be a gross understatement, but his fingerprints will not just live in the past, but forever be encouraging our future.”

Schultz received numerous honors, including the Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award from Northwestern in 2010 and being inducted into Medill’s Hall of Achievement in 2019. He was given the Ivan Preston Award for Outstanding Advertising Research Contribution by the American Academy of Advertising in 2014 and was named Outstanding Alumni of Michigan State University in 1988, Direct Marketing Educator of the Year in 1989, Distinguished Advertising Educator in 1992, Sales and Marketing Executive of the Year in 1996, and one of the top 80 Marketing Leaders by Sales and Marketing Management Magazine in 1998. In 2020, he was named a Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand Academy of Advertising.

He also was President of Agora, Inc., a global marketing, communication and branding consulting firm headquartered in Chicago.

Schultz is survived by his wife, Heidi, who was his business partner and co-author on several books. He also is survived by his sons Steven, Bradley and Jeff, as well as seven grandchildren Dory, Emily, Jacqueline, Colin, Benjamin, Daniel and Isabel.

In the coming months, Medill and the Northwestern community will come together to celebrate Schultz’s life and legacy.

Gifts given in memorial will be added to an endowed fund in IMC being created by Don and Heidi Schultz. To contribute, you may donate online or mail a contribution to:

Northwestern University
Alumni Relations and Development
1201 Davis Street
Evanston, IL 60208

Categories
1990s Featured Legacies Legacies

Betsy Rothstein (MSJ95)

Betsy Rothstein, columnist for the Daily Caller, passed away after a long battle with cancer.  Her friend, Olivia Nuzzi, said this about Rothstein in an article posted after her death in “The Intelligencer.”

“I don’t know what I expected Betsy Rothstein to look like, but I guess I wasn’t expecting a woman who made her living filleting media personalities and nurturing feuds to be so tiny in stature. When she approached me on the grass outside the Capitol building and introduced herself, I almost burst out laughing. She was delicate — almost birdlike — with a sweet, girlish voice. I can’t remember what exactly we were both doing there. It was some kind of rally, and we were surrounded by protesters and people dressed up like soldiers in the Revolutionary War. This was 2014, what would turn out to be the last semi-normal year in American politics. I’d only been a part of the Washington press corps for a few months, but already I knew about Betsy, having learned about her, as many young journalists did, when she wrote about me in her gossip column. I knew she was regarded with a mixture of fear and contempt. I also knew that my colleagues read her, scanned her copy for their boldfaced names. I did the same.

Betsy was a professional thorn in the side of Washington media figures, whom she covered at The Hill, and then Fishbowl DC, and then the Daily Caller. Nora Ephron once said that when she watched TV news, she did so wondering if what she was seeing was actually a romantic comedy. Betsy watched the political media as if it were a sitcom. She was always looking for characters, preferably ones that amused her. She thought we were all silly. She was chronically wrong on the minor details, but on this larger point she was always correct.

Betsy had confronted the idea that she might not live, and she had chosen to try very hard, to suffer, to continue to be a part of this world. She wanted to live more than those of us who do not have to consciously register our will to live each day. She was taken out unwillingly. She did not “lose a fight” or “lose a battle.” We did. Those of us who loved her, robbed of her spirit and originality. Robbed of her delightful strangeness. And those who feared or loathed her, spared of her bite, unaware that they have lost something vital too.”

Photo: Darrow Montgomery

https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2020/06/remembering-my-friend-betsy-rothstein.html

Categories
1990s Featured Legacies Legacies

Benjamin C. Williams (BSJ96)

On Thursday, September 17, 2020, Benjamin Charles Williams, beloved husband to Jill and devoted father to Ashley and Joel, passed away unexpectedly at the age of 46. 

Ben was born on April 14, 1974, in Houston, Texas, to Chuck and Debbie (Matteson) Williams. He attended Cypress Creek High School, where he made lifelong friends in the band and graduated in 1992. He loved to write and earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University in 1996. Shortly after graduation he joined the ranks of the Houston Police Department, graduating with Cadet Class 171 in March of 1998, and eventually achieved the rank of sergeant. On June 5, 1999, Ben married his childhood friend and high school sweetheart Jill McCormack. Ashley Rose was born on February 3, 2004, and Joel Benjamin on October 12, 2008. 

Ben was an encyclopedia of movie trivia and could settle any debate about anything movie-related. He was a steadfast Astros fan. He also had a heart for animals and was always bringing home or threatening to bring home a stray kitten, dog or any other species. 

Along with Jill, Ashley and Joel, Ben is survived by his father Chuck and wife Lisa, mother Debbie Ellisor and husband Gene, sister Erin Williams Lowery and husband Aaron, sister Allison Williams Reeves and husband Zac, stepbrother Don Ellisor, mother-in-law Pam McCormack, father-in-law Jack McCormack and wife Nicole, brother-in-law Mike McCormack and wife Suzana, and brother-in-law Heath Harrington and wife Kim. He also leaves behind many aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews and pets.

https://www.kleinfh.com/obituary/benjamin-williams

Categories
1990s Featured Legacies Featured Legacies Home Legacies

Joe Ruklick (MSJ90)

Former Northwestern basketball star Joe Ruklick died of natural causes Thursday, September 17, 2020. He was 82.

Rucklick played for the Wildcats from 1956-59 and was an All-American as a senior. The 6-foot-10 center said he was better known as a “walking footnote.” 

He was proud to have taken part in one of the NBA’s most iconic moments — assisting on Hall of Famer Wilt Chamberlain’s 99th and 100th points in a record-setting game for the Philadelphia Warriors on March 2, 1962, against the New York Knicks. 

“I was wide open,” Ruklick recalled in a 2016 interview with the Chicago Tribune. “I’m looking at the New York players who will not yield. I don’t know what I thought, but I knew I had to get the ball to Wilt. There were 46 seconds to go, and there’s a guy hanging on his left hip. He went, ‘Woo!’ and that meant he was open briefly. There were his hands, and I got the ball to him. And he scored.”

Ruklick said he patiently waited by the scorer’s table to make sure his assist was properly recorded. 

Ruklick, a Princeton, Illinois, native, averaged 19.9 points and 13.2 rebounds in three seasons at Northwestern — including 23 and 13 in 1958-59. The Warriors selected Ruklick in the second round (ninth overall) of the 1959 draft, and he played sparingly in three seasons. He said the pay was lousy and he morally objected to team owners wanting to keep him on the roster to appease fans who didn’t want too many Black players at the time.

“Many of them didn’t think there would be more than a handful of Black players every year,” he told the Tribune. “They thought: ‘Chamberlain is a freak. We’ll never see another Bill Russell.’ That’s how dumb we were back then. People were ugly sometimes. But it was as common as the morning sunshine.”

Chamberlain and Ruklick, who had played against each other in college when Chamberlain was at Kansas, remained friends until Chamberlain’s death in 1999.

After his NBA career, Ruklick became an investment banker and a father of three. He earned a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern at 50, later working at newspapers such as the Chicago Defender. Ruklick lived in Evanston and often attended Northwestern games as a reporter for the Aurora Voice.

https://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/college/ct-northwestern-basketball-joe-ruklick-dies-20200917-n5rpc7t5j5d47lc4ntmn5xcow4-story.html

Categories
1990s Featured Legacies Legacies

Rickey L. Wedeking (GJ95)

Rickey Lee Wedeking passed away on Wednesday, September 30, 2020. He was born on January 19, 1962, in Indianapolis to Dr. Fred L. Wedeking and Denise O. Wedeking. 

Rickey began regaling crowds at an early age with his infectious smile and impish nature. With initial aspirations to follow in his father’s footsteps, Rickey obtained his paramedic degree from Kalamazoo Valley Community College in 1980, the youngest to receive such a degree at that time. He then worked for Emmett and RNEMS Ambulance services and on his first run delivered a baby. Rickey next attended Michigan State University to study marketing, graduating in 1986. During his time as a Spartan, Rickey was very active with the Sigma Chi fraternity. Post graduation, Rickey started his own marketing firm in Kalamazoo, Different Dimensions, Inc. He later owned and operated Plainwell Printing and then acquired his real estate broker’s license to sell houses in the Kalamazoo area. 

Eventually, Rickey wanted to return to school, and he enrolled in Northwestern University’s marketing communications program. He graduated in 1995 with his graduate degree cum laude as class valedictorian. Rickey’s next adventure took him to Newport Beach, California, where he was employed in marketing research by Urban Science. He became president of the local chapter of the American Marketing Association. When not at work, Rickey loved his oceanside life and spent many weekends surfing, sailing and ambling around his beloved Catalina Island. 

Rickey lived life to the fullest, living large and loving hard, enjoying the arts, the bars, fine dining, the study of history and the Bible, world travel and, of course, his family. Rickey’s focus changed to healing and fighting after his diagnosis of multiple sclerosis in 1998. Rickey was always positive through tough times and willing to embrace his next battle. He and his family are especially thankful to all those at Alamo Nursing Home, his second family, who cared, laughed, loved and prayed with and for Rickey during his most challenging times. 

Rickey’s memory is still alive in those that survive him, including his parents, sister Tammy (Sue) and her husband, Steve Withers; brother Ritch Wedeking; aunts Nancy Wedeking and Peggy White; uncles Jeff Neel, Dickson Matos and family, Kilton Matos and family; many more beloved family in Puerto Rico; nephew Karsen Withers; niece Taryn Withers; and cousin Michelle Neel.

https://www.tributearchive.com/obituaries/18473734/Rickey-Wedeking

Categories
1990s Featured Legacies Legacies

Matthew T. Gamber (MSJ97)

Fr. Matthew T. Gamber S.J., age 61, passed away Friday, October 16, 2020, in Cincinnati, Ohio. Matt was a graduate of Loyola Academy, and received a bachelor’s in political science from Marquette University, a master’s in philosophy from Loyola University, a master’s of divinity from Weston Jesuit School of Theology, and a master’s in journalism from Northwestern University. Father Matt was a gifted journalist, and was published in the National Catholic Register, Catholic World Report and Catholic Herald. He was most recently appointed chaplain and director of youth ministry at St. Xavier High School. Previously, he was associate pastor at St. Francis Xavier Church in Cincinnati, and he enjoyed a lifelong career in the religious order including positions in Chicago, Gonzaga University in Washington, Xavier University in Cincinnati, and in the Vatican Radio and Catholic News Service in Rome, Italy.

Father Matt loved being a priest, and a channel of God’s healing graces and love for the people he served. He led a profoundly spiritual life, dedicated to his faith, his family, the Society of Jesus, and his many friends. Known for his hearty laugh and inquisitive spirit, Father Matt was beloved by many and enjoyed connecting with people wherever he went.

Matt was preceded in death by his father Mark J. and brother Lawrence M. Gamber. He is survived by his mother Ruth Ann (nee Henneman) Gamber; siblings Mark (MaryJo), William (Linda), Mary Margaret, and Robert (Suzan) Gamber; sister-in-law Carol Gamber; nieces and nephews Matthew (Alexandra), Casey, Charlie, Jamie, Mary Kate and Luke Gamber; and great nephew Benjamin.

https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/chicagotribune/obituary.aspx?n=matthew-t-gamber&pid=196973475

Categories
1990s Featured Legacies Featured Legacies Home Legacies

Tom Perrotta (BSJ98)

By Jason Gay for the Wall Street Journal

Our friend Tom Perrotta died Wednesday, January 6, 2021, at age 44, and if you never got a chance to meet him, all I can say is I wish you had. 

If you read this newspaper, you got to know Tom through his tennis reporting, which was smart and thorough, rich with the sort of detail you don’t notice unless you’re around the sport all the time, which Tom was. Tom was always there, which was how he got to know Roger Federer. It’s how he knew Serena Williams, too. But he also knew the many players who never cracked the top 400, as well as the parents, coaches, trainers, umpires, and all the employees behind the scenes who make the tournaments happen. Tennis has a lot more of those people than it does legends and superheroes, and every one of them was important to Tom. 

The man himself? He was aces. Tom was the Journal’s top writer at all the major tennis events, which meant that when the match ended — the moment when Federer raised his arms in triumph, or Rafael Nadal rolled to the red dirt in disbelief — it was Tom’s job to immediately render what happened and hit the send button, within a few minutes. There is pressure in that job. People can freak out. It isn’t uncommon, at a big sporting event, to see a reporter comically lose it on deadline. Tom didn’t lose it. He was unflappable, kind to colleagues and competitors, even when crunching a deadline. You could walk up to him right as a match concluded — he’d be typing away, an editor breathing down his neck, and you could ask him something unrelated, something totally unnecessary, like who won the Australian Open in 2009, and what time was the next LIRR back to Penn Station, and Tom would pause for a second, and say: I think that year was Rafa and Serena. And I’m pretty sure there’s a train at 9:33. Then click! He’d hit send on his own piece, which was always magic, a standard we aspired to. 

Here’s a little secret about what it’s like to cover one of those major tennis tournaments: It’s just as great as it sounds. It isn’t like the job doesn’t have its hassles, or bad days, but most of the time, it feels like you’re getting away with something. Tom had the fortune to come up at a time when tennis had ascended to an epic moment, surrounded by icons like Venus and Serena, Roger and Rafa, Andy and Novak. He had a front-row seat to a generation of players who will be talked about 100 years from now. Sometimes, I would catch Tom’s eye during one of those crazy matches, when the players were cramping, going back and forth like  prizefighters, and the stadium felt like it was about to lift off from all the crowd energy, and he’d give me this look that said: I can’t believe we get to do this. How lucky are we?

He got sick, diagnosed with a brain tumor at age 40, and he fought and fought, rallying that first season to make it to the U.S. Open, and then do nearly a full calendar of majors. The job got harder, which frustrated him, but what anchored him was his family: his wife, Rachel, and his two sons, Paul and Sean. They were everything to him. Over the past year, Tom often told me he was grateful for how the world had slowed down a bit, because it meant he could be at home with his family, a feeling he described in his final piece for the Journal. He was so young, and he’d been dealt a terribly unfair hand — it angered him; he confided that, too — but there were still moments he felt like a lucky guy. 

Tom Perrotta in Paris

This is how I want to remember him: This was a few years ago, in Paris, amid the French Open — he’d been through a wave of treatments, and he was feeling better, more himself, and leaving Roland Garros in the early evening, he was excited, because Rachel had flown into town. Tom picked out this place for all of us to go to dinner, not far from the Champs-Élysées, and we waited outside for a table for what seemed like hours, but we didn’t care, because it was one of those June twilights when the sun wasn’t in any kind of hurry, and more important: Rachel was here! Tom was so happy. Who could complain? A retired tennis pro walked by on the sidewalk, and Tom walked over and said a quick hello. It felt like Tom’s town, even if it wasn’t. 

We sat down to dinner, late, and the meal went on and on, with dessert, and maybe a little more dessert, because why not? No one says this sort of thing in the moment, but in the back of your mind, you’re thinking: How many nights like this are we going to get? 

When we finally paid the check and stepped outside, it was dark, and it was now raining, in the dreamy way you hope it rains in Paris. I asked Tom if he thought they were going to be able to play tennis tomorrow, and he said, who knows, he’d be there. He was always there. He smiled, and then he and Rachel walked off into the rain. 

https://www.wsj.com/articles/to-our-friend-tom-perrotta-who-was-an-ace-11610028844

Categories
1990s Featured Legacies Legacies

Mary Suzanne Costello Vandergrift (BSJ99)

Mary Suzanne Costello Vandergrift, a television news reporter and journalist, died July 26, 2019. She was 42. One of seven children, she was born in Wisconsin Jan. 27, 1977 to Patrick and Susan Costello.

A stellar student, Vandergrift graduated high school in 1995. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Medill in 1999. Peers remembered her as a natural storyteller and as an apt television reporter.  She was an on-air reporter for local news stations in several states including Indiana, West Virginia, Ohio, and Minneapolis. She was most proud of her field reporting during severe weather and her investigative work.

She met her husband, Nate Vandergrift, on the job in Dayton, Ohio in 2006, where he worked as a producer. They married on Dec. 31, 2008, and in 2011, they welcomed one daughter, Olivia Lorraine.

Friends and family remember her humor and her willingness to reach out to others in the face of adversity.

She is survived by her husband, Nathan Vandergrift, and his family; her daughter, Olivia; her mother, Susan; her siblings: William, Joseph, Stephanie, Elizabeth, Isaac, and Scott; her eight nieces and nephews, as well as aunts, an uncle, and cousins.

https://www.blaneyfuneralhome.com/obituary/mary-vandergrift