Categories
1980s Featured Legacies Home Home

Steve Albini (BSJ85)

Reprinted from Pitchfork.com
Photo credit: Casey Mitchell

Steve Albini, an icon of indie rock as both a producer and performer, died on Tuesday, May 7, of a heart attack, staff at his recording studio, Electrical Audio, confirmed to Pitchfork. As well as fronting underground rock lynchpins including Shellac and Big Black, Albini was a legend of the recording studio, though he preferred the term “engineer” to “producer.” He recorded Nirvana’s In Utero, Pixies’ Surfer Rosa, PJ Harvey’s Rid of Me, and countless more classic albums, and remained an outspoken critic of exploitative music industry practices until his final years. Shellac were preparing to tour their first album in a decade, To All Trains, which is scheduled for release next week. Steve Albini was 61 years old.

Despite his insistence that he would work with any artist who paid his fee, Albini’s catalog as a self-described audio engineer encompasses a swath of alternative rock that is practically a genre unto itself. After early work on Surfer Rosa, Slint’s Tweez, and the Breeders’ Pod, he became synonymous with brutal, live-sounding analog production that carried palpable raw energy. His unparalleled résumé in the late 1980s and 1990s includes the Jesus Lizard’s influential early albums, the Wedding Present’s Seamonsters, Brainiac’s Hissing Prigs in Static Couture, and records by Low, Dirty Three, Helmet, Boss Hog, Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, Hum, Superchunk, and dozens more. His influence rang through to the next generations of rock, punk, and metal at home and abroad, many of whom he went on to produce—the likes of Mogwai, Mclusky, Cloud Nothings, Mono, Ty Segall, and Sunn O))). He also recorded enduring greats of the singer-songwriter canon: Joanna Newsom’s Ys, Nina Nastasia’s early records, and much of the Jason Molina catalog among them.

Albini was born in Pasadena, California, and lived a peripatetic childhood before his family settled in Missoula, Montana. As a teenager, his discovery of Ramones transformed what he described, to Jeremy Gordon for The Guardian, as a “normal Montana childhood” into an altogether wilder entity. In the subsequent years, while studying journalism in Illinois, he was drawn into the Chicago punk scene that his music would come to both defy and define. Albini spent his days at the record store Wax Trax, buying every record that “looked interesting” and talking to “everybody with a funny haircut,” he told NPR.

“It was an extremely active, very fertile scene where everybody was participating on every level,” Albini said of Chicago’s music scene. “The community that I joined when I came to Chicago enabled me to continue on with a life in music. I didn’t do this by myself. I did this as a participant in a scene, in a community, in a culture, and when I see somebody extracting from that rather than participating in it as a peer, it makes me think less of that person.… My participation in all of this is going to come to an end at some point. The only thing that I can say for myself is that, along the way, it was a cool thing that I participated in, and on the way out, I want to make sure that I don’t take it with me.”

He began recording as Big Black in the early 1980s, channeling antisocial, sometimes violent themes through buzzsaw riffs and histrionic barks, grunts, and whelps, at first backed only by a drum machine (which remained a constant, pounding presence) and soon joined by Naked Raygun’s Jeff Pezzati and Santiago Durango; Dave Riley replaced Pezzati on bass for the band’s two landmark studio albums, Atomizer and Songs About Fucking. In his spare time, Albini would pen screeds in the 1980s zine Matter, admonishing bands in neighboring scenes and cementing the firebrand reputation that established him as an eminent rock grouch and refusenik.

After Big Black, Albini formed the short-lived Rapeman—a name he came to regret, despite the sardonic intent—before founding Shellac in the early 1990s, with Bob Weston and Todd Trainer. After a string of EPs through his longtime home of Touch and Go and Drag City, the band extensively toured (including an all-but-residency at Primavera Sound, the only music festival Albini was happy to play) and released five beloved albums: 1994’s At Action Park, 1998’s Terraform, 2000’s 1000 Hurts, 2007’s Excellent Italian Greyhound, and 2014’s Dude Incredible.

Albini has long been admired for sticking to his principles and questioning music industry standards, especially in the recording studio. He never took royalties from records on which he worked—including Nirvana’s In Utero, which has sold over 15 million copies—despite that being industry custom, and he kept his day rates low, especially for a producer with his pedigree. At Electrical Audio, his recording studio where he and staff members helped lay bricks in the construction process, Albini was famous for handing artists a yellow legal pad on the first day and instructing them to map out a written description of every song they were going to record. This was his way of avoiding future miscommunications and guaranteeing that artists maximized the in-studio time for which they paid. “The recording part is the part that matters to me—that I’m making a document that records a piece of our culture, the life’s work of the musicians that are hiring me,” he told The Guardian. “I take that part very seriously. I want the music to outlive all of us.”

Several bands have recounted experiences when Albini was behind the board reading a book or playing Scrabble during their recording sessions. As Albini explained it, this method helped keep his senses sharp and widened his perspective. “When I first started making records I would sit in front of the console concentrating on the music every second. I found out the hard way that I tended to fiddle with things unnecessarily and records ended up sounding tweaked and weird. I developed a couple of techniques to avoid this,” he explained in a Reddit AMA. “This has proven to be a really good threshold, so that if anything sounds weird or someone says something you immediately give it your full attention and your concentration hasn’t been ruined by staring at the speakers and straining all day.”

Throughout his career, Albini courted controversy through provocative band names (Rapeman, Run N***er Run), song titles ( “Pray I Don’t Kill You F***ot,” “My Black Ass”), and offhand statements (“I want to strangle Odd Future”). While he refused to apologize for his choice in names and jokes, in Michael Azerrad’s 2001 book Our Band Could Be Your Life, Albini made it clear that he believed his real stances on race, gender, LGBTQ rights, and politics were obvious. “I have less respect for the man who bullies his girlfriend and calls her ‘Ms’ than a guy who treats women reasonably and respectfully and calls them ‘Yo! Bitch,’” Albini told Azerrad. “The point of all this is to change the way you live your life, not the way you speak.”

Later in life, however, Albini repeatedly apologized for his past controversies, realizing that intent and moral clarity went only so far. “A lot of things I said and did from an ignorant position of comfort and privilege are clearly awful and I regret them. It’s nobody’s obligation to overlook that, and I do feel an obligation to redeem myself,” Albini wrote on X in 2021. “If anything, we were trying to underscore the banality, the everyday nonchalance toward our common history with the atrocious, all while laboring under the tacit *mistaken* notion that things were getting better. I’m overdue for a conversation about my role in inspiring ‘edgelord’ shit. Believe me, I’ve met my share of punishers at gigs and I sympathize with anybody who isn’t me but still had to suffer them.” He talked in depth about his regrets with The Guardian, MEL Magazine, and others.

Amid all of his ongoing work, Albini was a remarkable poker player. In 2022, he won a World Series of Poker gold bracelet after beating 773 other players in the $1,500 entry H.O.R.S.E. competition for a huge prize of $196,089. While most players dressed in button-up shirts and plain tees, Albini wore a furry, white hat shaped like a bear and a red Jack O’ Nuts shirt, saying the Athens noise-rock musicians “bring me luck.” He won another WSOP gold bracelet in 2018 for beating 310 players in seven card stud to the tune of $105,629. Back then, he was wearing a Cocaine Piss shirt during the big win. He had a massive grin on his face in the photos documenting both wins.

When asked how his career would be regarded if he ever retired, Albini told The Guardian, “I don’t give a shit. I’m doing it, and that’s what matters to me—the fact that I get to keep doing it. That’s the whole basis of it. I was doing it yesterday, and I’m gonna do it tomorrow, and I’m gonna carry on doing it.”

https://pitchfork.com/news/steve-albini-storied-producer-and-icon-of-the-rock-underground-dies-at-61/

Categories
1970s Featured Legacies Home Legacies

Roderick S.A. Oram (MSJ75)

As published in the New Zealand Herald:

Longtime financial and climate journalist Rod Oram was much loved and respected in the local business and media community.

Oram, who was a journalist for more than 40 years, died on Tuesday afternoon, after having a heart attack while cycling last weekend.

He was the inaugural editor of the Business Herald when it was launched as a distinct unit in 1997.

Born in the United Kingdom, Oram spent 20 years as an international financial journalist in Europe and North America, and travelled extensively in those continents and in Asia.

From 1975 to 1979, he held various journalist positions in Canada and from 1979, until joining the New Zealand Herald, he held a variety of posts at the Financial Times in London and New York City.

Fran O’Sullivan, NZME’s senior business correspondent and a longtime colleague and friend of Oram, recalled his passion for his work.

“I first met Rod Oram when I travelled to London on a Foreign and Commonwealth Office scholarship in the early 1990s. I was then editor of National Business Review – he was city editor at the Financial Times,” she recalled.

“His bubbling enthusiasm was contagious – right from the start. I like to think I also excited him with the derring-do that was possible in New Zealand business journalism at that time; particularly on the investigative front.

“We next met when Ivan Fallon was headhunting business journalists to join Wilson and Horton (predecessor of NZME) to launch the Business Herald. Rod set out to create the Business Herald as – what he used to call – a ‘beacon of hope’ for top-notch journalism in New Zealand.

“I will never forget his opening gambit – ‘well hello” – down the phone, as he navigated the frustrations of leading a team within a general newspaper environment as opposed to a dedicated financial newspaper.

“He ultimately left the Herald and became a brand in his own right – specialising in particular in the climate sphere.

“But he never lost that contagious enthusiasm – whether it was talking about his plan to reach 100 (sadly not to be); his great bike adventures across central Asia, travelling to the COP meetings under his own steam or talking about the family he cherished. Agree with him or not, he is a great loss to civil discourse in this country. He will be missed.”

Categories
1960s Featured Legacies Home Legacies

B.F. Helman (BSJ69)

BF (Bernard Frederick) Helman died peacefully Friday, Mar. 29, in suburban St. Louis, after a long illness. He was 76.

Actor, poet, writer, film expert and enthusiastic observer of politics, BF was truly a Renaissance man, with sharp wit and endless curiosity.

He was born in Granite City, IL, where his parents owned and operated a popular women’s clothing store, Helman’s.

He graduated from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University with a concentration in advertising followed by an advanced degree in Communications at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

BF held several positions in Chicago but his passion was the theater. He had numerous stage roles, and extensive on camera and voice over work, locally and nationally. He appeared in commercials and high profile corporate projects. A long time specialty was dramatic and comedic roles in syndicated radio dramas and programs.

BF’s passion project above all others was the Defiant Theatre Company in Chicago, where he acted and supported the group in countless other ways.

After more than 40 years, BF grew tired of the cruel Chicago winters and endless urban chaos. He relocated to St. Louis where he spent his last 10 years. He acted in Community Theater and actively participated in ROMEO groups, “really old guys eating out.”

His extended family in St. Louis, including his closest friend the late Barry Freedman, made sure BF was on the guest list for holidays and important occasions.

His friend group, locally and around the country, supported him during his illness: Johnny Heller, Don Rubin, Barbara Weiner, Allen Levin, Marshall Dyer, Barry Murov, Hedy Ehrlich, Ava Ehrlich and a close group of cousins.

He is preceded in death by his parents, Morris and Reeva Helman. He is survived by his brother Howard Helman (Phyllis), of Redondo Beach, CA, numerous cousins and theater friends all over the country.

https://www.dignitymemorial.com/obituaries/st-louis-mo/bf-helman-11748492

Categories
1940s Featured Legacies Home Legacies

Marjorie L. Greenberger (BSJ45)

Marjorie Livingston Greenberger, 100, passed away peacefully in her home in Corvallis, Oregon on March 13th. She is survived by her beloved children and grandchildren: Ellen Parker, Joseph Greenberger, Michael Greenberger, and Ann Greenberger; she was the grandmother of Andrew Parker and Lily Parker; great-grandmother of Hollis June Parker. Marjorie is predeceased by her husband Dr. Maurice Greenberger of Canton, Ohio; her brother Clifford Livingston of Merrill, Wisconsin; and her sister Helene (Livingston) Byrns of Madison, Wisconsin.

Marjorie grew up in Merrill, Wisconsin. She attended Northwestern University Medill School of Journalism, worked as a reporter, then taught English at Merrill High School. Marjorie married Dr. Maurice Greenberger and moved to Canton, Ohio where they raised their four children. She earned a Master’s degree in English from the University of Akron and taught for many years in their English Department.

Throughout her life, Marjorie’s siblings and their families gathered for summers on Merrill’s Lake Pesobic. Marjorie returned to the home that was always close to her heart and lived in Merrill for another 15 years before moving to Oregon to be near her children and grandchildren.

Marjorie was a gardener, avid reader, chocolate lover, and supported local libraries. She will always be remembered for her intelligence, gentle nature, and love for her family.

Condolences may be sent in care of: Fisher Funeral Home, 306 SW Washington Street, Albany, Oregon 97321.

The family suggests memorial donations to T.B. Scott Free Library or Merrill Historical Society.

https://www.fisherfuneralhome.com/obituaries/Marjorie-Livingston-Greenberger?obId=31109375

Categories
1950s Featured Legacies Featured Legacies Home Home Legacies Uncategorized

Al Borcover (MSJ57)

Republished from the Chicago Tribune 

Alfred Borcover was the Tribune’s travel editor in the 1980s and ’90s, a time when travel sections were a robust element of Sunday newspapers and writers covered the globe in search of interesting stories.

“Back in the day, Al took readers to places near and far with an easygoing style that made them feel that they were his traveling companions,” said Carolyn McGuire, a retired Tribune associate Travel editor. “Between assignments he was always available to give advice to anyone who asked how to beat jet lag or the best hotel to stay in — you name it.”

Borcover, 92, died of natural causes on Jan. 24 at the Warren Barr Lieberman long-term care facility in Skokie, said his wife of 34 years, Linda. A longtime Evanston resident, Borcover had been battling a range of health issues and had been in hospice care.

Born Alfred Seymour Borcover in Bellaire, Ohio, Borcover was the son of a Russian-born father and a mother who had immigrated to the U.S. from Austria. He received a bachelor’s degree from Ohio State University in 1953 and then served for two years in the U.S. Air Force, where he was a first lieutenant and served in Morocco and at a radar station in Maine, his family said.

In 1957, he received a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. Two years later he joined the Tribune, briefly as a reporter before becoming a copy editor.

Borcover joined the Tribune’s Travel section in 1963 and for the next 10 years was an assistant travel editor, while also writing long articles about various destinations. His first Travel section article, published July 1963, took readers to Vilas County, in north-central Wisconsin, which he described as a “scenic wonderland of 1,300 lakes and thousands of acres of towering forests.”

Borcover’s stories included a focus on affordable rail travel while he also visited far-flung locales such as Tunisia and Israel. During this time he provided the content for “Arthur Frommer’s Dollar-Wise Guide to Chicago,” which was published in 1967. Tribune book critic Clarence Petersen called it “authoritative, well-written, fascinating and up-to-date,” and a book “to remind us natives of some of the attractions of home.”

A series he developed in 1976 on Bicentennial travel destinations, including Yellowstone National Park, the Arizona desert, Glacier Bay in Alaska and the Grand Canyon, was awarded a Certificate of Appreciation from the American Revolution Bicentennial Administration.

Borcover was named the Tribune’s Travel editor in 1979. In addition to leading the section and assigning stories to writers, he continued to file reports from around the world and also wrote a weekly column.

In 1986, he broke a story about scams that had been launched in Chicago by sham vacation brokers who took consumers’ fees but then denied them trips on the dates they desired. Ultimately the brokers were targeted by the Federal Trade Commission and sued by the state attorney general’s office before the state General Assembly passed legislation cracking down on such travel promoters.

Borcover continued focusing on travel scams, and his columns were distributed around the country through Tribune wire services.

“Though he was based here in Chicago, his syndicated stories and columns traveled as widely as he did,” said Randy Curwen, who succeeded Borcover as the Tribune’s Travel editor. “As a travel writer, editor and columnist, Al certainly knew his way around the world. And everybody in the travel world knew Al.”

In addition to basic information on destinations such as maps and costs, Borcover offered personal observations in his stories.

“What struck me … was that I didn’t feel as if I were in South America,” Borcover wrote in March 1983 on a trip to Buenos Aires. “The city’s ambience and architecture — from the colorful Italian district of La Boca with its brightly painted homes to the grandiose scale of Avenida 9 de Julio — were definitely European. The undiluted ethnicity of the few gracious residents I had met, and others I overheard, left me with the quick impression that this melting-pot country had not melted as in the U.S. Language of origin had not been buried, but preserved.”

Retired Tribune foreign correspondent R.C. “Dick” Longworth recalled Borcover’s “always upbeat and good-natured” personality.

“Al was one of the nicest guys in the Tribune newsroom,” Longworth said. “He was also a real pro, a graceful writer and a fine editor whose own sense of fun and adventure infused the paper’s Travel section.”

After visiting 60 countries, Borcover stepped down as Travel editor in 1993 and retired from the Tribune in February 1994.

“People always ask: What’s your favorite place?” Borcover wrote in his farewell column. “I never have an adequate answer. There are just too many places in the world to love, and I’m not finished seeing all that I want to see. There’s no end in sight.”

Borcover continued to write about travel for another 17 years as a freelancer, including a biweekly column for the Travel section.

Shortly after his final byline in the Tribune in 2011, Borcover began volunteering at O’Hare International Airport with Travelers Aid, working at an information desk.

“He loved volunteering to work on the travel desk at O’Hare, and would go every week, for a time, to sit at that desk in one of the terminals and offer advice and help to travelers,” said former Tribune correspondent Storer “Bob” Rowley, a longtime friend.

Categories
1990s Featured Legacies Legacies

Susan Ashworth Bader (MSJ95)

Republished from the East Bay Times

Susan Ashworth Bader, freelance journalist and former Editor-in-Chief of TV Technology, a broadcast industry trade publication, died suddenly on December 4 at her home in Oakland, CA. She was 52.

Compassionate and curious, Susie, as she was known by family, friends and colleagues, was drawn to reporting at an early age. With no school newspaper at Serrano High School, she instead worked on the yearbook. At UC Riverside, she covered campus events from basketball to student body governance meetings for the Highlander.

After graduation, she was accepted at Medill to obtain her Masters Degree. There it was crystallized in her, the core journalistic standards of accuracy, transparency and accountability, which she fiercely held herself and other journalists to throughout her career. During her last quarter at school, with Montana, her cat in tow, Susie moved to Washington, D.C., to continue her studies through assignments covering breaking news events in the nations capital. She met her future husband, Rob Bader, in Gaithersburg, MD. She first began working for TV Technology where she reported on advances in the field of broadcast television, from the newest flying cameras filming the X-Games to virtual reality TV news studios and even “how that elusive yellow first-down line appears on a football field.”

Susie and Rob were married in her hometown of Wrightwood, CA, in 1999. They moved to the Bay Area when Rob was accepted in law school at UC College of the Law in San Francisco. Susie worked for the housing publication Hanley Wood as an editor before moving on to Inman News and American City Business Journals. Susie was a reporter at the annual National Association of Broadcasters convention in Las Vegas for many years. Sadly, in 2022, the Bader family was devastated when Rob was diagnosed Stage IV Cancer. He passed away in March 2023. Susie is survived by her children Jackson, Nate and Charlotte, her sister Jennifer, her brother George Kenneth and her father, George Richard.

Susan Ashworth Bader

Categories
1980s Featured Legacies

Melissa George Lindland (MSJ88)

Melissa George Lindland, age 60, of Chicago, IL, died peacefully at home surrounded by her family on January 7, 2024. Melissa was the loving wife of Matthew Lindland and dedicated mother to four children: Clara, 27, of Arlington, VA; Robert, 25, of New York City; Christopher, 23, of Chicago; and Jane, 20, a junior at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

A resident of Chicago since 1991, she and Matt were married at St. Chrysostom’s Church in Chicago in 1993. Together, they lived in Chicago’s Lakeview neighborhood, and, in 2004, built a home together in Andersonville, which Melissa designed. This is the home their four children have been raised in over the past 19 years.

Born in Chicago to Nancy Jane Connery and Alfred George, Melissa was raised in Wilmette, IL. She was a graduate ofs New Trier High School, Loyola University of Chicago, and the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University.

After receiving her master’s degree, she was a reporter for newspapers in Florida and Madison, WI; for Reuters in New York and Chicago; and for Crain’s Chicago Business.

Melissa is remembered by her family and friends as a tenacious and loving advocate and supporter. She used the skills she honed as a reporter, such as confronting civic corruption, and turned them toward seeking out and getting access to the best resources for her children. As a result, they embraced the opportunities she made available and excelled. Whether finding pre-dawn sports training or getting everyone going on a long mountain hike, Melissa modeled a focus on inquisitive research and follow-through that was much to her family’s benefit.

Melissa’s debilitating ailments began in late 2019. She spent years thoroughly researching her symptoms and found that the source stemmed from Loeys-Dietz Syndrome – a rare genetic disorder that affects the production of collagen and connective tissue. She is at rest after four years of aggressively treating and enduring the manifestations of this disease throughout her body.

Melissa is survived by her husband, Matthew and her four adult children, Clara, Robert, Christopher, and Jane. She was a loving sister to John George of Glenview, IL, Jane George of Chicago, IL, and her deceased sister, Regina George Tobin. If you are so inclined, in lieu of flowers or other tributes, we ask that you remember Melissa by supporting the Loeys-Dietz Syndrome Foundation at www.loeysdietz.org.

https://www.legacy.com/us/obituaries/chicagotribune/name/melissa-lindland-obituary?id=54090525

Categories
1980s Featured Legacies Featured Legacies Home Home Legacies

Sheila Lorelle Jack (MSJ85)

Sheila Lorelle Jack was born May 26, 1953 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania as the youngest child to the late Robert D. Jack, Sr., and the late Alberta V. Jack Scott. She was a beautiful, intelligent social butterfly, sincerely loved by her family and many dear friends. Her innate desire for knowledge led her to pursue an impressive career that allowed her to work in a variety of sectors including government, academia, and nonprofit. Sheila’s achievements included being a college lecturer, seasoned communications director, and Emmy award-winning producer.

Sheila was educated in Harrisburg public schools and graduated with honors from John Harris Senior High School. She chose to attend Spelman College where she joined the lifelong sisterhood of Delta Sigma Theta, Inc. before graduating cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in English. Sheila continued her education at the University of Michigan, earning a master’s in urban planning with a concentration in housing and real estate.

Years later, she returned to her English educational roots and earned a master’s degree in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University. She flourished in the communications field and worked at WUSA TV Channel 9, Washington, DC as a news Associate Producer and Public Affairs Producer; Reporter for WHMT Channel 17, Albany, NY; Press Secretary, New York City Human Resources Administration, New York, NY; National Director, Media and Press Relations for the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, White Plains, NY; Deputy Director of Marketing and Communications, Mayor Bill Campbell’s administration, Atlanta, GA; Director of Communications and Special Assistant to the President, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA; Associate Director, Diversity Outreach, Alzheimer’s Association, Chicago, IL; Media Specialist, United States Census Bureau, Atlanta, GA; Communications Consultant, Cascade United Methodist Church, Atlanta, GA.

Sheila’s tenacity and hard work was recognized when she was awarded two Emmy Awards from the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences – Washington, DC Chapter for Outstanding Program Achievement for, “Alzheimer’s: The Painful Enigma” and “Deaf Rights Now!” Additionally, she received nine Emmy nominations in that market between 1985 and 1989.

Sheila volunteered and participated in several organizations including The Junior League; Leadership New York (1992-1993); National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ); Atlanta Association of Black Journalists (AABJ); and East Point/College Park Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta, Inc.

Sheila was a loyal, proud, and active member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. She valued the friendships of her Delta Sisters, attended national conventions, regional conferences, local chapter events, and get-togethers with her line sisters. Sheila touched the lives of many people with her innate ability to engage in interesting conversations which could range from discussing politics to reality TV. She also just loved having a good chat.

Sheila always expressed her love to her close-knit family and enjoyed family get-togethers. She is survived by her sisters, Barbara A. Freeland of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and Gloria E. Jack of Fairburn, Georgia, as well as her brothers, Wayne S. Jack of Atlanta, Georgia and Michael S. Jack of College Park, Georgia. Also surviving are six nieces, three nephews, six great-nieces, four great-nephews, one great-great-nephew, and a host of cherished cousins. Sheila’s two oldest brothers, Robert D. Jack, Jr., and Lawrence E. Jack preceded her in transitioning into eternal life.

https://obits.pennlive.com/us/obituaries/pennlive/name/sheila-jack-obituary?id=53683980

Categories
1970s Legacies

Sherrie Cronin (BSJ76)

Born in the early morning hours of December 1, 1954, and raised on the great plains of Hays, Kansas, Sherrie Roth Cronin peacefully exhaled her last breath on the night of October 23, 2023, surrounded by love, in the mountains of North Carolina, after a hard fought battle with cancer.

She was an engaging child, curious about our planet and the limitless mysteries of space. She also had a vivid imagination and used it, from an early age, to create expansive new worlds, twisting plots and intriguing characters, through her gift of storytelling. That set the stage. Before graduating from Hays High School in 1972, she was a permanent fixture on the Honor Roll, Editor of the school newspaper, star on the Debate Team, won the State Championship for Extemporaneous Speaking, and was the State Chairman of a national teenage political association. She published a short story in Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine at the age of 21, received a degree in journalism from Northwestern University and a degree in geology from Colorado School of Mines, then canoed 500 miles down the Coppermine River in 1978. This was the launch pad for a decades long career as a geophysicist, interpreting seismic data, and spending time out on the rigs, all while showing up tirelessly for her husband, three children and parents.

Her career took her from Chicago, Illinois to Golden, Colorado to Baton Rouge, Louisiana to Fort Worth and Houston, Texas, before retiring in Black Mountain, North Carolina. To round out this remarkable life, Sherrie traveled extensively to 46 countries, earned her Private Pilot’s license, achieved the status of solo skydiver, drove cross-country to Burning Man, volunteered for a trio of meaningful causes; the local library, a domestic violence hotline, and the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers Association. And she still managed to find the time, energy, and inspiration to fulfill one of her greatest, lifelong passions, storytelling, as she proudly self-published 12 full-length novels.

Sherrie is loved and survived by her husband of 42 years, Kevin Cronin of Black Mountain, NC, her sister, June Roth Hanson (Gary) of Galena, Illinois, her three children, Francis-Casey Roth Cronin of San Francisco, CA, Shenandoah-Marie Vonfeldt Cronin (John Reyna) of Dallas, Texas and Emerald-Teresa McManus Cronin of Chicago, Illinois. She is preceded in death by her mom and dad, Mary Jane Von Feldt Roth and Francis Joseph Roth, both of Hays, Kansas. Sherrie was a wonderful mom, sister, wife, daughter, and friend.

She was fierce, interesting, kind, curious, driven, brilliant, creative and generous. She will be missed more than words can express. An inquisitive scientist, eloquent storyteller and avid adventurer, she gave of her time and her talents to help make this a better world.

https://www.legacy.com/us/obituaries/hdnews/name/sherrie-cronin-obituary?id=53493621

Categories
1970s Featured Legacies

Barbara Ann Bolsen (BSJ72)

Rev. Barbara Ann Bolsen, 72, of Rogers Park formerly of Cincinnati, OH died after a long illness on August 16, 2023. She is survived by her loving brothers David (Kathy) and Bill (Bev); cherished nieces and nephews, Erin, Ken, Marti, Bill, and Lisa; many grand nieces and nephew; goddaughters Julia and Carla, and her beloved dogs Huckleberry (Huck) and Dandelion (Danny).

Barbara graduated from the School of Journalism at Northwestern University in 1972. At the American Medical Association, she rose through the ranks from reporter to become the first woman to be named Editor of the award-winning American Medical News. In 1996, she left the AMA to pursue a divinity degree on a full time basis at Chicago Theological Seminary.

An ordained UCC minister, Barbara sought work that would engage her heart as well as her mind. In 1997 she joined The Night Ministry as one of the organization’s first Youth Outreach Workers. She helped launch weekly street outreach events for young people in Lakeview, often appearing on the nighttime streets in her clerical collar to earn the trust of unhoused youth, and was instrumental in establishing The Crib, an overnight emergency shelter for young adults. A tireless advocate for social justice, she was a member of a number of civic organizations, including the Lakeview Action Coalition (now ONE Northside). She also served as President of the Boards of Directors of the Community Renewal Society and the Blowitz-Ridgeway Foundation.

In 2020, after 23 years at The Night Ministry, Barbara retired as Vice President of Strategic Partnerships and Community Engagement to pursue her interest in photography.

Throughout her life, Barbara traveled extensively, whether for personal pleasure, professional reasons, or while leading church youth groups on mission work in the United States and Central America. She sang in her church choir, officiated at many weddings, belonged to two book groups, and for several decades was an avid skier and sailer.

With humor, an uplifting spirit, and a generous heart, Barbara touched the lives of countless people who are better for having known her and who will mourn her loss.

Memorials in Barbara’s honor may be made to The Night Ministry or Chicago Theological Seminary (https://www.ctschicago.edu/).

https://www.chicagolandcremationoptions.com/obituary/barbara-bolsen