Categories
1950s Featured Legacies Legacies Uncategorized

Al Borcover (MSJ57)

Republished from the Chicago Tribune 

Alfred Borcover was the Tribune’s travel editor in the 1980s and ’90s, a time when travel sections were a robust element of Sunday newspapers and writers covered the globe in search of interesting stories.

“Back in the day, Al took readers to places near and far with an easygoing style that made them feel that they were his traveling companions,” said Carolyn McGuire, a retired Tribune associate Travel editor. “Between assignments he was always available to give advice to anyone who asked how to beat jet lag or the best hotel to stay in — you name it.”

Borcover, 92, died of natural causes on Jan. 24 at the Warren Barr Lieberman long-term care facility in Skokie, said his wife of 34 years, Linda. A longtime Evanston resident, Borcover had been battling a range of health issues and had been in hospice care.

Born Alfred Seymour Borcover in Bellaire, Ohio, Borcover was the son of a Russian-born father and a mother who had immigrated to the U.S. from Austria. He received a bachelor’s degree from Ohio State University in 1953 and then served for two years in the U.S. Air Force, where he was a first lieutenant and served in Morocco and at a radar station in Maine, his family said.

In 1957, he received a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. Two years later he joined the Tribune, briefly as a reporter before becoming a copy editor.

Borcover joined the Tribune’s Travel section in 1963 and for the next 10 years was an assistant travel editor, while also writing long articles about various destinations. His first Travel section article, published July 1963, took readers to Vilas County, in north-central Wisconsin, which he described as a “scenic wonderland of 1,300 lakes and thousands of acres of towering forests.”

Borcover’s stories included a focus on affordable rail travel while he also visited far-flung locales such as Tunisia and Israel. During this time he provided the content for “Arthur Frommer’s Dollar-Wise Guide to Chicago,” which was published in 1967. Tribune book critic Clarence Petersen called it “authoritative, well-written, fascinating and up-to-date,” and a book “to remind us natives of some of the attractions of home.”

A series he developed in 1976 on Bicentennial travel destinations, including Yellowstone National Park, the Arizona desert, Glacier Bay in Alaska and the Grand Canyon, was awarded a Certificate of Appreciation from the American Revolution Bicentennial Administration.

Borcover was named the Tribune’s Travel editor in 1979. In addition to leading the section and assigning stories to writers, he continued to file reports from around the world and also wrote a weekly column.

In 1986, he broke a story about scams that had been launched in Chicago by sham vacation brokers who took consumers’ fees but then denied them trips on the dates they desired. Ultimately the brokers were targeted by the Federal Trade Commission and sued by the state attorney general’s office before the state General Assembly passed legislation cracking down on such travel promoters.

Borcover continued focusing on travel scams, and his columns were distributed around the country through Tribune wire services.

“Though he was based here in Chicago, his syndicated stories and columns traveled as widely as he did,” said Randy Curwen, who succeeded Borcover as the Tribune’s Travel editor. “As a travel writer, editor and columnist, Al certainly knew his way around the world. And everybody in the travel world knew Al.”

In addition to basic information on destinations such as maps and costs, Borcover offered personal observations in his stories.

“What struck me … was that I didn’t feel as if I were in South America,” Borcover wrote in March 1983 on a trip to Buenos Aires. “The city’s ambience and architecture — from the colorful Italian district of La Boca with its brightly painted homes to the grandiose scale of Avenida 9 de Julio — were definitely European. The undiluted ethnicity of the few gracious residents I had met, and others I overheard, left me with the quick impression that this melting-pot country had not melted as in the U.S. Language of origin had not been buried, but preserved.”

Retired Tribune foreign correspondent R.C. “Dick” Longworth recalled Borcover’s “always upbeat and good-natured” personality.

“Al was one of the nicest guys in the Tribune newsroom,” Longworth said. “He was also a real pro, a graceful writer and a fine editor whose own sense of fun and adventure infused the paper’s Travel section.”

After visiting 60 countries, Borcover stepped down as Travel editor in 1993 and retired from the Tribune in February 1994.

“People always ask: What’s your favorite place?” Borcover wrote in his farewell column. “I never have an adequate answer. There are just too many places in the world to love, and I’m not finished seeing all that I want to see. There’s no end in sight.”

Borcover continued to write about travel for another 17 years as a freelancer, including a biweekly column for the Travel section.

Shortly after his final byline in the Tribune in 2011, Borcover began volunteering at O’Hare International Airport with Travelers Aid, working at an information desk.

“He loved volunteering to work on the travel desk at O’Hare, and would go every week, for a time, to sit at that desk in one of the terminals and offer advice and help to travelers,” said former Tribune correspondent Storer “Bob” Rowley, a longtime friend.

Categories
1990s Featured Legacies Legacies

Susan Ashworth Bader (MSJ95)

Republished from the East Bay Times

Susan Ashworth Bader, freelance journalist and former Editor-in-Chief of TV Technology, a broadcast industry trade publication, died suddenly on December 4 at her home in Oakland, CA. She was 52.

Compassionate and curious, Susie, as she was known by family, friends and colleagues, was drawn to reporting at an early age. With no school newspaper at Serrano High School, she instead worked on the yearbook. At UC Riverside, she covered campus events from basketball to student body governance meetings for the Highlander.

After graduation, she was accepted at Medill to obtain her Masters Degree. There it was crystallized in her, the core journalistic standards of accuracy, transparency and accountability, which she fiercely held herself and other journalists to throughout her career. During her last quarter at school, with Montana, her cat in tow, Susie moved to Washington, D.C., to continue her studies through assignments covering breaking news events in the nations capital. She met her future husband, Rob Bader, in Gaithersburg, MD. She first began working for TV Technology where she reported on advances in the field of broadcast television, from the newest flying cameras filming the X-Games to virtual reality TV news studios and even “how that elusive yellow first-down line appears on a football field.”

Susie and Rob were married in her hometown of Wrightwood, CA, in 1999. They moved to the Bay Area when Rob was accepted in law school at UC College of the Law in San Francisco. Susie worked for the housing publication Hanley Wood as an editor before moving on to Inman News and American City Business Journals. Susie was a reporter at the annual National Association of Broadcasters convention in Las Vegas for many years. Sadly, in 2022, the Bader family was devastated when Rob was diagnosed Stage IV Cancer. He passed away in March 2023. Susie is survived by her children Jackson, Nate and Charlotte, her sister Jennifer, her brother George Kenneth and her father, George Richard.

Susan Ashworth Bader

Categories
1980s Featured Legacies

Melissa George Lindland (MSJ88)

Melissa George Lindland, age 60, of Chicago, IL, died peacefully at home surrounded by her family on January 7, 2024. Melissa was the loving wife of Matthew Lindland and dedicated mother to four children: Clara, 27, of Arlington, VA; Robert, 25, of New York City; Christopher, 23, of Chicago; and Jane, 20, a junior at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

A resident of Chicago since 1991, she and Matt were married at St. Chrysostom’s Church in Chicago in 1993. Together, they lived in Chicago’s Lakeview neighborhood, and, in 2004, built a home together in Andersonville, which Melissa designed. This is the home their four children have been raised in over the past 19 years.

Born in Chicago to Nancy Jane Connery and Alfred George, Melissa was raised in Wilmette, IL. She was a graduate ofs New Trier High School, Loyola University of Chicago, and the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University.

After receiving her master’s degree, she was a reporter for newspapers in Florida and Madison, WI; for Reuters in New York and Chicago; and for Crain’s Chicago Business.

Melissa is remembered by her family and friends as a tenacious and loving advocate and supporter. She used the skills she honed as a reporter, such as confronting civic corruption, and turned them toward seeking out and getting access to the best resources for her children. As a result, they embraced the opportunities she made available and excelled. Whether finding pre-dawn sports training or getting everyone going on a long mountain hike, Melissa modeled a focus on inquisitive research and follow-through that was much to her family’s benefit.

Melissa’s debilitating ailments began in late 2019. She spent years thoroughly researching her symptoms and found that the source stemmed from Loeys-Dietz Syndrome – a rare genetic disorder that affects the production of collagen and connective tissue. She is at rest after four years of aggressively treating and enduring the manifestations of this disease throughout her body.

Melissa is survived by her husband, Matthew and her four adult children, Clara, Robert, Christopher, and Jane. She was a loving sister to John George of Glenview, IL, Jane George of Chicago, IL, and her deceased sister, Regina George Tobin. If you are so inclined, in lieu of flowers or other tributes, we ask that you remember Melissa by supporting the Loeys-Dietz Syndrome Foundation at www.loeysdietz.org.

https://www.legacy.com/us/obituaries/chicagotribune/name/melissa-lindland-obituary?id=54090525

Categories
1980s Featured Legacies Featured Legacies Home Home Legacies

Sheila Lorelle Jack (MSJ85)

Sheila Lorelle Jack was born May 26, 1953 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania as the youngest child to the late Robert D. Jack, Sr., and the late Alberta V. Jack Scott. She was a beautiful, intelligent social butterfly, sincerely loved by her family and many dear friends. Her innate desire for knowledge led her to pursue an impressive career that allowed her to work in a variety of sectors including government, academia, and nonprofit. Sheila’s achievements included being a college lecturer, seasoned communications director, and Emmy award-winning producer.

Sheila was educated in Harrisburg public schools and graduated with honors from John Harris Senior High School. She chose to attend Spelman College where she joined the lifelong sisterhood of Delta Sigma Theta, Inc. before graduating cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in English. Sheila continued her education at the University of Michigan, earning a master’s in urban planning with a concentration in housing and real estate.

Years later, she returned to her English educational roots and earned a master’s degree in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University. She flourished in the communications field and worked at WUSA TV Channel 9, Washington, DC as a news Associate Producer and Public Affairs Producer; Reporter for WHMT Channel 17, Albany, NY; Press Secretary, New York City Human Resources Administration, New York, NY; National Director, Media and Press Relations for the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, White Plains, NY; Deputy Director of Marketing and Communications, Mayor Bill Campbell’s administration, Atlanta, GA; Director of Communications and Special Assistant to the President, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA; Associate Director, Diversity Outreach, Alzheimer’s Association, Chicago, IL; Media Specialist, United States Census Bureau, Atlanta, GA; Communications Consultant, Cascade United Methodist Church, Atlanta, GA.

Sheila’s tenacity and hard work was recognized when she was awarded two Emmy Awards from the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences – Washington, DC Chapter for Outstanding Program Achievement for, “Alzheimer’s: The Painful Enigma” and “Deaf Rights Now!” Additionally, she received nine Emmy nominations in that market between 1985 and 1989.

Sheila volunteered and participated in several organizations including The Junior League; Leadership New York (1992-1993); National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ); Atlanta Association of Black Journalists (AABJ); and East Point/College Park Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta, Inc.

Sheila was a loyal, proud, and active member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. She valued the friendships of her Delta Sisters, attended national conventions, regional conferences, local chapter events, and get-togethers with her line sisters. Sheila touched the lives of many people with her innate ability to engage in interesting conversations which could range from discussing politics to reality TV. She also just loved having a good chat.

Sheila always expressed her love to her close-knit family and enjoyed family get-togethers. She is survived by her sisters, Barbara A. Freeland of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and Gloria E. Jack of Fairburn, Georgia, as well as her brothers, Wayne S. Jack of Atlanta, Georgia and Michael S. Jack of College Park, Georgia. Also surviving are six nieces, three nephews, six great-nieces, four great-nephews, one great-great-nephew, and a host of cherished cousins. Sheila’s two oldest brothers, Robert D. Jack, Jr., and Lawrence E. Jack preceded her in transitioning into eternal life.

https://obits.pennlive.com/us/obituaries/pennlive/name/sheila-jack-obituary?id=53683980

Categories
1970s Legacies

Sherrie Cronin (BSJ76)

Born in the early morning hours of December 1, 1954, and raised on the great plains of Hays, Kansas, Sherrie Roth Cronin peacefully exhaled her last breath on the night of October 23, 2023, surrounded by love, in the mountains of North Carolina, after a hard fought battle with cancer.

She was an engaging child, curious about our planet and the limitless mysteries of space. She also had a vivid imagination and used it, from an early age, to create expansive new worlds, twisting plots and intriguing characters, through her gift of storytelling. That set the stage. Before graduating from Hays High School in 1972, she was a permanent fixture on the Honor Roll, Editor of the school newspaper, star on the Debate Team, won the State Championship for Extemporaneous Speaking, and was the State Chairman of a national teenage political association. She published a short story in Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine at the age of 21, received a degree in journalism from Northwestern University and a degree in geology from Colorado School of Mines, then canoed 500 miles down the Coppermine River in 1978. This was the launch pad for a decades long career as a geophysicist, interpreting seismic data, and spending time out on the rigs, all while showing up tirelessly for her husband, three children and parents.

Her career took her from Chicago, Illinois to Golden, Colorado to Baton Rouge, Louisiana to Fort Worth and Houston, Texas, before retiring in Black Mountain, North Carolina. To round out this remarkable life, Sherrie traveled extensively to 46 countries, earned her Private Pilot’s license, achieved the status of solo skydiver, drove cross-country to Burning Man, volunteered for a trio of meaningful causes; the local library, a domestic violence hotline, and the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers Association. And she still managed to find the time, energy, and inspiration to fulfill one of her greatest, lifelong passions, storytelling, as she proudly self-published 12 full-length novels.

Sherrie is loved and survived by her husband of 42 years, Kevin Cronin of Black Mountain, NC, her sister, June Roth Hanson (Gary) of Galena, Illinois, her three children, Francis-Casey Roth Cronin of San Francisco, CA, Shenandoah-Marie Vonfeldt Cronin (John Reyna) of Dallas, Texas and Emerald-Teresa McManus Cronin of Chicago, Illinois. She is preceded in death by her mom and dad, Mary Jane Von Feldt Roth and Francis Joseph Roth, both of Hays, Kansas. Sherrie was a wonderful mom, sister, wife, daughter, and friend.

She was fierce, interesting, kind, curious, driven, brilliant, creative and generous. She will be missed more than words can express. An inquisitive scientist, eloquent storyteller and avid adventurer, she gave of her time and her talents to help make this a better world.

https://www.legacy.com/us/obituaries/hdnews/name/sherrie-cronin-obituary?id=53493621

Categories
1970s Featured Legacies

Barbara Ann Bolsen (BSJ72)

Rev. Barbara Ann Bolsen, 72, of Rogers Park formerly of Cincinnati, OH died after a long illness on August 16, 2023. She is survived by her loving brothers David (Kathy) and Bill (Bev); cherished nieces and nephews, Erin, Ken, Marti, Bill, and Lisa; many grand nieces and nephew; goddaughters Julia and Carla, and her beloved dogs Huckleberry (Huck) and Dandelion (Danny).

Barbara graduated from the School of Journalism at Northwestern University in 1972. At the American Medical Association, she rose through the ranks from reporter to become the first woman to be named Editor of the award-winning American Medical News. In 1996, she left the AMA to pursue a divinity degree on a full time basis at Chicago Theological Seminary.

An ordained UCC minister, Barbara sought work that would engage her heart as well as her mind. In 1997 she joined The Night Ministry as one of the organization’s first Youth Outreach Workers. She helped launch weekly street outreach events for young people in Lakeview, often appearing on the nighttime streets in her clerical collar to earn the trust of unhoused youth, and was instrumental in establishing The Crib, an overnight emergency shelter for young adults. A tireless advocate for social justice, she was a member of a number of civic organizations, including the Lakeview Action Coalition (now ONE Northside). She also served as President of the Boards of Directors of the Community Renewal Society and the Blowitz-Ridgeway Foundation.

In 2020, after 23 years at The Night Ministry, Barbara retired as Vice President of Strategic Partnerships and Community Engagement to pursue her interest in photography.

Throughout her life, Barbara traveled extensively, whether for personal pleasure, professional reasons, or while leading church youth groups on mission work in the United States and Central America. She sang in her church choir, officiated at many weddings, belonged to two book groups, and for several decades was an avid skier and sailer.

With humor, an uplifting spirit, and a generous heart, Barbara touched the lives of countless people who are better for having known her and who will mourn her loss.

Memorials in Barbara’s honor may be made to The Night Ministry or Chicago Theological Seminary (https://www.ctschicago.edu/).

https://www.chicagolandcremationoptions.com/obituary/barbara-bolsen

Categories
1960s Featured Legacies Featured Legacies Home Legacies

Hank DeZutter (MSJ65)

He had the street-smarts of a newsman, the whimsey of a jazz-loving poet, and a reformer’s distaste for all things unjust. Hank DeZutter, 80, died July 14, 2023, of a brain bleed after a fall days earlier in the Lincoln Park apartment he shared with wife Barbara. Hank covered protests and political unrest during the late 60s for the Chicago Daily News, winning awards including one for exposing FBI spying on activists at the U. of Illinois.

DeZutter head shot.

He helped launch the Chicago Journalism Review in response to the overly pro-police slant editors gave to violence during the ’68 Democratic Convention. Hank went on to teach writing and journalism at city colleges and Columbia in the South Loop. There he helped found Community Media Workshop, a program to help neighborhood groups get better press. Meantime, he wrote for the Chicago Reader on neighborhood issues, including a 1995 front-pager on a then-unknown Barack Obama. In spare time, he wrote books, spun poetry for the Chicago Journal, played boogie piano, and made impossibly long golf putts.

Surviving are wife Barbara Belletini Fields; her daughters Jayne Mattson and Ana Boyer Davis; sons Max (Sarah), Chris, and daughter Amanda Kotlyar (Simon); stepson Agward “Eddie” Turner; sisters Joyce (Ronnie) Mooneyham and Wendy (Steve) Callahan; and five grandchildren. Predeceased by mother Evelyn (née Dammer) and father Henri DeZutter. Gifts to Courage to Fight Gun Violence, Box 51196, Wash., DC 20091, or https://giffords.org/lawcenter/gun-laws/

Featured image courtesy of Block Club Chicago.

Block Club Chicago article about the legacy of Hank DeZutter.

https://www.legacy.com/us/obituaries/chicagotribune/name/henry-dezutter-obituary?id=35954608

Categories
1980s Featured Legacies Legacies

William Snider (MSJ85)

William (Bill) Joseph Snider died June 20, 2023, at age 62 after a year-long battle with pancreatic cancer.

Bill grew up in the small Ohio town of Litchfield. He called himself a NASA baby, as his parents met working for NASA. He shared fond memories of his father creating intricate model airplanes and flying them on the weekends with friends. Bill found comfort early on in books and took to reading incessantly for the rest of his life.
Bill made his journey across the country to study Economics at Occidental College in Southern California. He spoke fondly of his introduction to fresh foods in the cafeteria that opened his world to the joys of flavor. While in school, he took trips with a friend to Tijuana to build houses for those without. He even took a creative writing class with the then future president Barack Obama when Bill just knew him as “Barry”.

After college, Bill found work in the area setting up and maintaining the Grand Prix equestrian jumping standards. He then got a bit more serious and earned a Master’s Degree in Journalism at Northwestern University, in Evanston, Illinois.

Bill focused his writing career on K-12 education. He wrote for Education Week with his best friend, Blake Rodman, while they lived together in Washington D.C.

He was introduced to his former wife, B. Ann Matthews, at Kramer Books & Afterwords Cafe through their beloved late friend and chef, Damien. Bill and Ann married in North Carolina, where Ann was from, in the summer of 1990.
They later moved to San Francisco where Bill worked his way up to becoming the editor of Edutopia, published by the George Lucas Education Foundation.

The couple next moved to Greensboro, N.C., where in 1996 their daughter, Roxanne, was born. From that point on, she was the light of Bill’s life.

A lifelong passion for food led Bill to switch career paths. He taught himself how to bake artisan breads, hoping to fill a gaping hole in the local biscuit and cornbread cuisine. He liked to say that baking cured his habits of procrastination and being easily distracted.
Bill and Ann opened Simple Kneads Bakery in 2001. The bakery was beloved by many. The Asiago Peppercorn bread was a favorite, although some would argue the olive bread was better.
Ten years ago, he met his love, Margaret McEnally, who allowed him to share her life. They created a loving home together with her young daughter, Leslie, which brought Bill great comfort and joy.
Bill enjoyed watching golf on TV and said it was the perfect background for taking naps.

During his last days, his daughter, Roxanne, who he said was his greatest legacy, asked him if he had any advice. He responded: “keep it balanced” and “love is the most important thing.”
In his final FaceBook post, he wrote, “Here’s the secret to a happy life: ‘Accept what you cannot change and be grateful for every little thing.'”
He is predeceased by his brother Steven James Snider and survived by his daughter, Roxanne Snider, longtime partner, Margaret McEnally, and step-daughter, Leslie Rudd, as well as his siblings Patricia Lorene Humphress, Diane Elaine Snider, and Michael Edward Snider.

Categories
1970s Featured Legacies Legacies

Jay Cook (BSJ70)

Jay Francis Cook, of Lithia, Florida passed away on June 12, 2023. He was surrounded by family and his loving wife of 8 years, Nancy, holding his hand. Born in Flushing, NY and grew up in Oyster Bay, NY, Jay graduated from Northwestern University with a Journalism degree and then went on to Indiana University School of Law to earn his Doctorate of Jurisprudence; practicing real estate law when he joined Dorsey & Whitney LLP in 1973 and became a partner in the firm in 1979 until 2007 when he moved to Naples, FL where he continued to practice law until he passed. Jay’s memory will be cherished by his wife, Nancy; son, Christopher; stepdaughters, Laurie (Alan) and Leslie; six grandchildren, Camden, Lukas, Noah, Jude, Mason, and Mila; his siblings, Bruce (Anne), Ann (Paul), Peter, Barbara (Dennis) and many nieces and nephews. Jay is predeceased by his parents: Frank G Cook and Adrienne M (Weiss). Jay enjoyed traveling with Nancy, playing golf and most of all loved spending time with his family and friends.

https://www.startribune.com/obituaries/detail/0000461353/

Categories
1970s Featured Legacies Featured Legacies Home

Deborah H. Quirk (MSJ74)

Deborah “Deb” Hardin Quirk passed away at her home in Hastings, Nebraska, on June 19, 2023. She was 72.

Deb was born in Hastings on July 30, 1950, to Bob and Marge Hardin. She graduated from Hastings High School in 1968. While in high school, she hosted her own radio show on KHAS Radio and was the youngest person in Hastings to earn a radio engineers license. She also worked in the announcer’s booth for American Legion Baseball games at Duncan Field.

Deb went on to the University of Denver where she earned Phi Beta Kappa honors and a Bachelor’s Degree in Mass Communications in 1972. She then earned a Master’s Degree in Journalism from Medill. While at DU, she reactivated the Kappa Delta Sorority chapter and later served as an alumni advisor to the chapter at Northwestern.

Deb returned to Hastings in 1973 to serve as the Development Director for Central Community College in Hastings and later as the Communications Director for the Central Community College system in Grand Island.

She was passionate about serving the community. She served two terms on the Adams Central School Board and took pride in her work as the chair of the building committee during the planning and construction of the new gymnasium in the early 2000s. She also served on the Hastings Planning Commission. She was a long-time member of Business and Professional Women, and served a term as the statewide President. She was also a member of the Fortnightly Study Group and the Torch Club.

Linked to her dedication to public service was her lifelong engagement with politics. In 1976, Deb was working on a local city council campaign when her oldest sister, Penny, suggested she seek advice from John Quirk, who was volunteering on Jimmy Carter’s presidential campaign. She did. Their candidates both won election, and they both remained involved in politics throughout their lives, with Deb serving as State Chair of the Democratic Party in the mid-1990s. Just two days before she passed, Deb attended one final meeting of local Democrats in Hastings.

More importantly, politics brought Deb and John together for a lifelong partnership. They were engaged July 7, 1977, (7/7/77) and married on New Year’s Eve that year. Their son, Andrew Robert “Rob,” was born in 1985. For more than 40 years, Deb worked alongside John at Quirk Land & Cattle Co., first maintaining the cattle records and ultimately as the office manager.

Deb was an avid golfer. She served on the Lochland Country Club board and was a leader in the women’s golf association where she served as a tireless advocate for women’s golf. Deb was a dedicated fan of all sports — particularly football and any women’s sport. On Saturdays and Sundays throughout the fall, she could always be found watching a game, especially the Huskers on Saturday and the Denver Broncos on Sunday.

Survivors include her son Andrew Robert “Rob” Quirk of Brooklyn, New York; her sister, Su (Hardin) Ryden, and her husband, Jerome Ryden, of Aurora, Colorado; a brother, Mike Hardin, and his wife, Margaret Hardin, of Aurora, Colorado; a sister-in-law, Mary Quirk, and her husband, Jim Anderson, of Minneapolis, Minnesota; and numerous nieces, nephews, grandnieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her parents; her sister, Penny Hardin; and her husband, John Quirk.

https://theindependent.com/news/local/obituaries/deborah-deb-hardin-quirk/article_5f1f3065-f9f5-5341-99ce-2b09b3fcbda9.html