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Roderick S.A. Oram (MSJ75)

As published in the New Zealand Herald:

Longtime financial and climate journalist Rod Oram was much loved and respected in the local business and media community.

Oram, who was a journalist for more than 40 years, died on Tuesday afternoon, after having a heart attack while cycling last weekend.

He was the inaugural editor of the Business Herald when it was launched as a distinct unit in 1997.

Born in the United Kingdom, Oram spent 20 years as an international financial journalist in Europe and North America, and travelled extensively in those continents and in Asia.

From 1975 to 1979, he held various journalist positions in Canada and from 1979, until joining the New Zealand Herald, he held a variety of posts at the Financial Times in London and New York City.

Fran O’Sullivan, NZME’s senior business correspondent and a longtime colleague and friend of Oram, recalled his passion for his work.

“I first met Rod Oram when I travelled to London on a Foreign and Commonwealth Office scholarship in the early 1990s. I was then editor of National Business Review – he was city editor at the Financial Times,” she recalled.

“His bubbling enthusiasm was contagious – right from the start. I like to think I also excited him with the derring-do that was possible in New Zealand business journalism at that time; particularly on the investigative front.

“We next met when Ivan Fallon was headhunting business journalists to join Wilson and Horton (predecessor of NZME) to launch the Business Herald. Rod set out to create the Business Herald as – what he used to call – a ‘beacon of hope’ for top-notch journalism in New Zealand.

“I will never forget his opening gambit – ‘well hello” – down the phone, as he navigated the frustrations of leading a team within a general newspaper environment as opposed to a dedicated financial newspaper.

“He ultimately left the Herald and became a brand in his own right – specialising in particular in the climate sphere.

“But he never lost that contagious enthusiasm – whether it was talking about his plan to reach 100 (sadly not to be); his great bike adventures across central Asia, travelling to the COP meetings under his own steam or talking about the family he cherished. Agree with him or not, he is a great loss to civil discourse in this country. He will be missed.”

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1970s Legacies

Sherrie Cronin (BSJ76)

Born in the early morning hours of December 1, 1954, and raised on the great plains of Hays, Kansas, Sherrie Roth Cronin peacefully exhaled her last breath on the night of October 23, 2023, surrounded by love, in the mountains of North Carolina, after a hard fought battle with cancer.

She was an engaging child, curious about our planet and the limitless mysteries of space. She also had a vivid imagination and used it, from an early age, to create expansive new worlds, twisting plots and intriguing characters, through her gift of storytelling. That set the stage. Before graduating from Hays High School in 1972, she was a permanent fixture on the Honor Roll, Editor of the school newspaper, star on the Debate Team, won the State Championship for Extemporaneous Speaking, and was the State Chairman of a national teenage political association. She published a short story in Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine at the age of 21, received a degree in journalism from Northwestern University and a degree in geology from Colorado School of Mines, then canoed 500 miles down the Coppermine River in 1978. This was the launch pad for a decades long career as a geophysicist, interpreting seismic data, and spending time out on the rigs, all while showing up tirelessly for her husband, three children and parents.

Her career took her from Chicago, Illinois to Golden, Colorado to Baton Rouge, Louisiana to Fort Worth and Houston, Texas, before retiring in Black Mountain, North Carolina. To round out this remarkable life, Sherrie traveled extensively to 46 countries, earned her Private Pilot’s license, achieved the status of solo skydiver, drove cross-country to Burning Man, volunteered for a trio of meaningful causes; the local library, a domestic violence hotline, and the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers Association. And she still managed to find the time, energy, and inspiration to fulfill one of her greatest, lifelong passions, storytelling, as she proudly self-published 12 full-length novels.

Sherrie is loved and survived by her husband of 42 years, Kevin Cronin of Black Mountain, NC, her sister, June Roth Hanson (Gary) of Galena, Illinois, her three children, Francis-Casey Roth Cronin of San Francisco, CA, Shenandoah-Marie Vonfeldt Cronin (John Reyna) of Dallas, Texas and Emerald-Teresa McManus Cronin of Chicago, Illinois. She is preceded in death by her mom and dad, Mary Jane Von Feldt Roth and Francis Joseph Roth, both of Hays, Kansas. Sherrie was a wonderful mom, sister, wife, daughter, and friend.

She was fierce, interesting, kind, curious, driven, brilliant, creative and generous. She will be missed more than words can express. An inquisitive scientist, eloquent storyteller and avid adventurer, she gave of her time and her talents to help make this a better world.

https://www.legacy.com/us/obituaries/hdnews/name/sherrie-cronin-obituary?id=53493621

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Barbara Ann Bolsen (BSJ72)

Rev. Barbara Ann Bolsen, 72, of Rogers Park formerly of Cincinnati, OH died after a long illness on August 16, 2023. She is survived by her loving brothers David (Kathy) and Bill (Bev); cherished nieces and nephews, Erin, Ken, Marti, Bill, and Lisa; many grand nieces and nephew; goddaughters Julia and Carla, and her beloved dogs Huckleberry (Huck) and Dandelion (Danny).

Barbara graduated from the School of Journalism at Northwestern University in 1972. At the American Medical Association, she rose through the ranks from reporter to become the first woman to be named Editor of the award-winning American Medical News. In 1996, she left the AMA to pursue a divinity degree on a full time basis at Chicago Theological Seminary.

An ordained UCC minister, Barbara sought work that would engage her heart as well as her mind. In 1997 she joined The Night Ministry as one of the organization’s first Youth Outreach Workers. She helped launch weekly street outreach events for young people in Lakeview, often appearing on the nighttime streets in her clerical collar to earn the trust of unhoused youth, and was instrumental in establishing The Crib, an overnight emergency shelter for young adults. A tireless advocate for social justice, she was a member of a number of civic organizations, including the Lakeview Action Coalition (now ONE Northside). She also served as President of the Boards of Directors of the Community Renewal Society and the Blowitz-Ridgeway Foundation.

In 2020, after 23 years at The Night Ministry, Barbara retired as Vice President of Strategic Partnerships and Community Engagement to pursue her interest in photography.

Throughout her life, Barbara traveled extensively, whether for personal pleasure, professional reasons, or while leading church youth groups on mission work in the United States and Central America. She sang in her church choir, officiated at many weddings, belonged to two book groups, and for several decades was an avid skier and sailer.

With humor, an uplifting spirit, and a generous heart, Barbara touched the lives of countless people who are better for having known her and who will mourn her loss.

Memorials in Barbara’s honor may be made to The Night Ministry or Chicago Theological Seminary (https://www.ctschicago.edu/).

https://www.chicagolandcremationoptions.com/obituary/barbara-bolsen

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Jay Cook (BSJ70)

Jay Francis Cook, of Lithia, Florida passed away on June 12, 2023. He was surrounded by family and his loving wife of 8 years, Nancy, holding his hand. Born in Flushing, NY and grew up in Oyster Bay, NY, Jay graduated from Northwestern University with a Journalism degree and then went on to Indiana University School of Law to earn his Doctorate of Jurisprudence; practicing real estate law when he joined Dorsey & Whitney LLP in 1973 and became a partner in the firm in 1979 until 2007 when he moved to Naples, FL where he continued to practice law until he passed. Jay’s memory will be cherished by his wife, Nancy; son, Christopher; stepdaughters, Laurie (Alan) and Leslie; six grandchildren, Camden, Lukas, Noah, Jude, Mason, and Mila; his siblings, Bruce (Anne), Ann (Paul), Peter, Barbara (Dennis) and many nieces and nephews. Jay is predeceased by his parents: Frank G Cook and Adrienne M (Weiss). Jay enjoyed traveling with Nancy, playing golf and most of all loved spending time with his family and friends.

https://www.startribune.com/obituaries/detail/0000461353/

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Deborah H. Quirk (MSJ74)

Deborah “Deb” Hardin Quirk passed away at her home in Hastings, Nebraska, on June 19, 2023. She was 72.

Deb was born in Hastings on July 30, 1950, to Bob and Marge Hardin. She graduated from Hastings High School in 1968. While in high school, she hosted her own radio show on KHAS Radio and was the youngest person in Hastings to earn a radio engineers license. She also worked in the announcer’s booth for American Legion Baseball games at Duncan Field.

Deb went on to the University of Denver where she earned Phi Beta Kappa honors and a Bachelor’s Degree in Mass Communications in 1972. She then earned a Master’s Degree in Journalism from Medill. While at DU, she reactivated the Kappa Delta Sorority chapter and later served as an alumni advisor to the chapter at Northwestern.

Deb returned to Hastings in 1973 to serve as the Development Director for Central Community College in Hastings and later as the Communications Director for the Central Community College system in Grand Island.

She was passionate about serving the community. She served two terms on the Adams Central School Board and took pride in her work as the chair of the building committee during the planning and construction of the new gymnasium in the early 2000s. She also served on the Hastings Planning Commission. She was a long-time member of Business and Professional Women, and served a term as the statewide President. She was also a member of the Fortnightly Study Group and the Torch Club.

Linked to her dedication to public service was her lifelong engagement with politics. In 1976, Deb was working on a local city council campaign when her oldest sister, Penny, suggested she seek advice from John Quirk, who was volunteering on Jimmy Carter’s presidential campaign. She did. Their candidates both won election, and they both remained involved in politics throughout their lives, with Deb serving as State Chair of the Democratic Party in the mid-1990s. Just two days before she passed, Deb attended one final meeting of local Democrats in Hastings.

More importantly, politics brought Deb and John together for a lifelong partnership. They were engaged July 7, 1977, (7/7/77) and married on New Year’s Eve that year. Their son, Andrew Robert “Rob,” was born in 1985. For more than 40 years, Deb worked alongside John at Quirk Land & Cattle Co., first maintaining the cattle records and ultimately as the office manager.

Deb was an avid golfer. She served on the Lochland Country Club board and was a leader in the women’s golf association where she served as a tireless advocate for women’s golf. Deb was a dedicated fan of all sports — particularly football and any women’s sport. On Saturdays and Sundays throughout the fall, she could always be found watching a game, especially the Huskers on Saturday and the Denver Broncos on Sunday.

Survivors include her son Andrew Robert “Rob” Quirk of Brooklyn, New York; her sister, Su (Hardin) Ryden, and her husband, Jerome Ryden, of Aurora, Colorado; a brother, Mike Hardin, and his wife, Margaret Hardin, of Aurora, Colorado; a sister-in-law, Mary Quirk, and her husband, Jim Anderson, of Minneapolis, Minnesota; and numerous nieces, nephews, grandnieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her parents; her sister, Penny Hardin; and her husband, John Quirk.

https://theindependent.com/news/local/obituaries/deborah-deb-hardin-quirk/article_5f1f3065-f9f5-5341-99ce-2b09b3fcbda9.html

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Jay Howard Leve (BSJ78, MSJ79)

Jay Howard Leve, 66, passed away on December 5, 2022 at his home in Sun City West, AZ.

Beloved Father of Sarah Leve of Philadelphia, PA, Dear Brother of Karen Leve Braverman of Louisville, CO, Loving Uncle to Michael and Jennifer Braverman of Denver, CO and Joshua and Emily Segal of Los Angeles, CA. Dear Son of the late Rubin and Beverly Leve of St. Louis, MO. Former Husband of Betsy Gitelle of Montclair, NJ, and cousin, friend and mentor to many.

Jay grew up in St. Louis before attending Northwestern University where he earned his undergraduate and Master of Science degrees from Medill. After working at the Miami Herald in Miami, Jay attended the Parsons School of Design in New York City and then moved there to head the Humanware Agency at Citibank, a creative think tank for user interface design and development. Jay continued on to become the founder and CEO of Hypotenuse and SurveyUSA, known as America’s Pollster.

At SurveyUSA, Jay revolutionized the public opinion polling and market research industries in the early 1990s by being the first firm to use interactive voice response technology. Asking questions in the recorded voice of a local news anchor ― a Jay Leve innovation ― and answered by respondents pressing keys on their touch-tone phones, SurveyUSA dramatically decreased the amount of time it took to conduct research and its cost, making it possible for the first time for individuals, companies, and organizations of any size to conduct scientific research. In the 30+ ensuing years, Leve grew SurveyUSA into one of the nation’s best-known polling firms, winning numerous awards for accuracy. SurveyUSA won acclaim for the quality of its methodology and construction of questions because Leve consistently applied the rigorous journalistic principles he learned at Medill, practiced at the Herald, and believed in passionately.

Published obituary

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Kevin M. Lamb (MSJ73)

Kevin McDonald Lamb, 71, was born on Oct. 1, 1951, in St. Paul, Minnesota, and died peacefully on Oct. 30 at Oak Creek Terrace rehab center in Kettering. Kevin was the beloved husband of Carol Lamb, loving father of Courtney Goubeaux and the late Ryan Lamb, father-in-law of Robin Lamb and Justin Goubeaux, and grandfather of Payton, Griffin and Zooey Lamb. He was the dear brother of Larry (Carole) Lamb, Chris (Lesly) Lamb, Jenni (Dale) Allard, and Becky Lamb. Kevin is also survived by many dear relatives and friends. He was preceded in death by his parents Bob and Jean Lamb, and in-laws Tony and Mary Matusin.

Kevin’s lifelong passion for sports took him to The Milwaukee Journal, Newsday and The Chicago Sun Times as a sportswriter. He was hired to cover the Brewers right out of college at Northwestern University, a first for the Journal. He also covered the Chicago Bears, which took him to yearly NFL playoff games and Super Bowls, the highlight being the 1985 Bears Super Bowl win over the Patriots. He wrote several books and contributed to Sports Illustrated and NFL Properties, among other publications. He joined the Dayton Daily News as an investigative reporter, and later became the Health and Medical reporter. Along the way, Kevin won several local and national awards. A Gathering of family and friends 10 am until service time with a Celebration of Life service planned for 11 am, Saturday, Dec. 3, at Tobias Funeral Home, 5471 Far Hills Ave., Kettering, 45429. To send a condolence, visit www.Tobias-funeral.com.

legacy.com

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Charles G. Williams (MSJ74)

Charles Gallup ‘Chuck’ Williams passed away Friday June 3, 2022 after experiencing a catastrophic brain hemorrhage. With his wife and daughters by his side, Chuck left for the great squash court in the sky while being serenaded by Neil Young, Bob Dylan, and the Grateful Dead.

Chuck was born in Bridgeport, Conn., as the first son of Arthur Collins Williams and Mary Helen Mitchell Williams. He followed his older sister, Kit, and had two younger brothers, Bill and Doug. Their childhood was full of little league, bikes, golf, tennis, and skiing in Vermont. Chuck attended elementary and middle school in the small town of Fairfield, Conn., and then left to attend high school at Andover in Massachusetts. Chuck went on to earn a bachelor’s of arts degree in history in 1973 at the University of Rochester, where he also played squash and soccer and developed a taste for Genesee Cream Ale and the Garbage Plate from Nick Tahoe’s. Chuck earned a master’s degree at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in 1974.

He began his career as a freelance writer in Rochester, N.Y., where he wrote for several publications including the Brighton Pittsford Post. Chuck was then employed by the Cancer Center of Strong Memorial Hospital, starting a long career in public relations and communications for health care systems. While working in Rochester, Chuck met Jackie Wygant and in his usual unhurried fashion waited a year to ask her out. Two months before their wedding in 1979, Chuck competed in the U.S. Squash National Championships at the Multnomah Athletic Club in Portland, Ore., and while there was invited to apply for a job at O.H.S.U. Jackie said no. 10 months later, they made an epic cross country trip in a U-haul and arrived in the Pacific Northwest, the place that would become their forever home. The PNW, in turn, welcomed them with a layer of ash from the eruption of Mt. St. Helens shortly after they arrived. The couple immersed themselves in a multitude of outdoor activities, including mountain climbing, cross-country skiing, camping, hiking, and soaking up the sun at the Oregon Coast. Kidding, they learned it is almost never sunny at the Oregon Coast!

In 1982, the couple’s first daughter, Laurel, came into the world. Chuck continued working at O.H.S.U. and Jackie fondly remembers passing the infant through the window into his office so he could watch her while she played squash. Chuck started working at Good Samaritan Hospital in 1985, and soon after the couple’s second daughter, Kendra, joined the family. Luckily for her, she entered and exited the hospital through the regular doors.

Chuck continued his career in public relations at Shriners Hospital from 1992 to 1999. He then worked as the regional director of Kids in a Drugfree Society (K.I.D.S.) for a year before going on to work at Providence Health System. He worked at Providence from 2001 to 2012 in Public Affairs and Internal Communications and was the editor of the Spirit Newsletter. Chuck finished his career at CareOregon where he worked until he retired in 2017.

Chuck loved to hike and camp and shared his love of the outdoors with his daughters including taking each for their first summit at Saddle Mountain around 8 years of age. Chuck also passed on his competitive spirit, coaching his daughters in soccer and softball, and cheering them on in countless other sports.

While helping to raise his two daughters and working his full-time job, Chuck continued to be a competitive squash player, achieving number 6 in the nation in 40+ softball singles. He also taught squash and organized tournaments.

Chuck founded a local accreditation program for the Portland Metro Chapter of Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) and served on its board, including as President in 1997. In 2000, he was honored with their William W. Marsh Lifetime Achievement Award. He also served on the boards of many other non-profit organizations. While working and volunteering, Chuck forged close ties with many members of the local print, radio, and television media. In addition, Chuck was an enthusiastic mentor and encouraged many aspiring public relations professionals. At last count, there were over 200 people who were mentored by Chuck while seeking their APR accreditation. Chuck loved his career and made lifelong friends at every job and every organization he was a part of.

Chuck is survived by his wife, Jackie Wygant; his daughters, Laurel Williams (Carl Kloos) and Kendra Williams (Christian Richardson); three grandchildren, Adelyn, William, and Margaret; his three siblings, Kit Krents, Arthur ‘Bill’ Williams, and Doug Williams (Deidre Williams); his two sisters-in-law, Catherine Wygant (Dan Monroe) and Holly Wygant; three nephews and two nieces and their families; and many east coast cousins.

A celebration of life will be held later this summer in Portland, Ore., and Chuck’s final resting place will be in his beloved Landgrove, Vt. In lieu of flowers please send donations to PRSAOregon.org for the APR Accreditation Education Fund, Street Roots, Nursingale, the Oregon Stroke Center at OHSU, Friends of the Historic Columbia River Highway, or the Oregon Natural Desert Association.

Please sign the online guest book at www.oregonlive.com/obits

obits.oregonlive.com

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1970s Featured Legacies Legacies

Sheryl Jedlinski (BSJ75)

Sheryl Lynn Jedlinski, age 68, passed peacefully on March 12, 2022, following a seven-year battle with cancer. Sheryl bravely fought Parkinson’s Disease for 24 years, writing a book and popular blog about her journey. She traveled the country, coaching and helping others fighting chronic and progressive illnesses. Born December 12, 1953 in the Bronx, Sheryl was the daughter of the late Leonard Applebaum & Lorraine Gilbert. She is survived by her devoted husband Tony; her sons Jason (Jay) and Steven (Megan); her beloved granddaughters, Parker and Kendall; her brother David (Diane) and their children: Jeremy, Sarah and Jenny.

Source: Legacy.com

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Ernie Torriero (MSJ77)

Ernie Torriero (MSJ77)

As war approached in Baghdad, most U.S. journalists evacuated. Not Ernie Torriero, a reporter for a major U.S. newspaper. He was one of the few American journalists who remained on the ground during the war that felled the Saddam Hussein government.

Torriero covered some of the world’s major conflicts of the early 21st Century, working in the Middle East, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Israel for the Chicago Tribune.

By 2010, he brought what colleagues call “his energy and enthusiasm” to Voice of America. Tuesday, February 15, VOA leadership announced Torriero passed away in the early morning.

“I am personally devastated by Ernie’s passing and my deepest thoughts and sympathies are with his entire family and his many friends,” said Acting VOA Director Yolanda López. “Since 2010 when Ernie first joined VOA, he proved himself to be a talented and incredibly versatile journalist, working across nearly every division on some of our highest profile stories and issues. Ernie was an extraordinary colleague who represented the very best of VOA and his loss will be felt across our entire organization.”

Torriero most recently served as Digital Managing Editor in English to Africa where he was working to create a news website and upgrade social media coverage.

“It is so hard to say goodbye to Ernie. He was a terrific colleague, always sharing great insights and ideas, and his energy and enthusiasm kept us all moving forward,” said Sonya Laurence Green who was his last supervisor as former chief of the English to Africa service. “He was also a terrific friend, telling many jokes and stories from his years as a journalist in almost every corner of the world.”

Previously at VOA, Torriero served as chief of the China Branch, managing editor of the Extremism Watch Desk, Middle East editor in VOA’s Central News Division and executive producer for VOANews.com, the agency’s lead English web site.

Torriero won awards from the Overseas Press Club, the Society of Professional Journalists, the Scripps Howard Foundation and the Florida Press Club. He was winner of the Paul Hansell Award in 1995, the top merit for a Florida journalist for a year’s body of work.

He earned an undergraduate degree in economics from the University of Notre Dame and a Master of Science from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, where he lectured as an adjunct professor.

Green said Torriero was known among his friends as being “a bit of a gourmand, cooking up wonderful dishes in his spare time” who could also “commiserate about the absurdities of life and work.”

During the past two years, Ernie oversaw digital news coverage of Africa’s 54 countries, significantly driving social media traffic to VOA Africa platforms. The website Ernie and his staff were building, voaafrica.com, is expected to go online in April, about the same time its editor would have turned 68.

Ernie is survived by his loving wife Antje Torriero, who serves as a Craft Video Editor in VOA Central Production Services, and their two 15-year-old twin sons, Andreas and Julius.

Source: VOA